Debra Sanders Blog
I am one of those people who thinks we all need to do a little bit better when it comes to avoiding the ease and
trappings that accepting mediocrity brings. I am a fervent supporter of those who take a stand in effort to make
things
better for our planet and its no-legged, four-legged, two-legged, winged, single-celled, multi-celled, green,
red, black
, brown and white inhabitants.

I am also one who has deep respect for those individuals who can do this while demonstrating a little bit of
panache
, because I’ve learned that displaying passion without panache doesn’t accomplish much.

Not everyone has panache. Genuine panache is kind of like having good skin when you’re sixteen—it’s a
remarkable blessing. Not that you’re any less of a person because you don’t have clear skin; it’s just a whole lot
easier to get a date if you don’t have to contend with a face covered with obvious blemishes and eruptions.

So it is with panache. If you have it, things in life are just easier. Doors seem to open a little faster, and you can

go places and do things that would require a lot more work than if you have, say, a personality that’s kind
of.... oily and....you know, inflammatory.

Most of us have met someone during our lifetime with panache. I’m not referring to slick politicians or

evangelists who display a kind of practiced and rehearsed (albeit intense and very compelling) sort of
magnetism; but rather to the sort of person who displays the kind of genuine charm that turns reluctant
bystanders into an avid participants…who seems to inspire affection while fighting for the right things to
happen. The person who can advocate for the underdog without coming across like a martyr.

Julia Roberts, as Erin Brockovitch, was a good example of someone with panache. You couldn’t help but like her.

This blog is dedicated to offering people the chance to speak up regarding things they feel passionate about:
public education, health care, disability rights, diversity, animal rights, the environment, brain injuries, children,

the elderly, kindness. Whatever. But hopefully it’s to be more than a sanctuary with a pulpit from which we each
emote, for many of those are already in place.

Here at A Matter of Panache, I hope to create a community where we also learn how to more effectively channel

our passions in ways that brings about true reform; a place where we can be both teachers and learners in the
art of being, not just passionate, but productively passionate.

So, speak up. Are you one of those individuals who have inspired change—be it within yourself, neighborhood,

city or planet? What have been your successes? Where did you go wrong?

Or tell of someone who has impacted you; someone displaying a bit of panache that we can all learn from.

Because when it comes right down to it, I think it’s about more than just being passionate. It’s about displaying

our passions in ways that embrace rather than alienates. It's about championing our causes in ways that
draw others in and lights the way, making it safer for them to ride our bandwagons.

It's about having both passion and a little bit of panache.

                                        
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